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Step 5

Backup and Recover

Use these tools to setup back ups of your data and systems to better protect against and recover from ransomware attacks.

Imagine you’re a multimedia journalist covering weeks of protests against government corruption in your city. It’s been backbreaking work to document what’s going on – hauling the weight of a small child in equipment. At the end of your shift you go home, pop your memory card in the computer to begin transferring your day’s work, and crash on the couch.

A few hours later, you open your computer, eager to send some shots to your editor for the morning headlines except the files aren’t there. Instead of thumbnails depicting your hard-won images, there are thousands of icons that say “Your Computer Has Been Blocked.” And it’s not just that day’s images. Years of your work has been rendered inaccessible by a ransomware attack. You suspect the attack came from an organized crime group loyal to the corrupt government. Either you pay up or the images don’t see the light of day – it’s a win-win for them.

Fortunately for you, an accident with your camera a few years earlier compelled you to invest in some sturdy external hard drives. Even

though the day’s photos are lost, the stakes aren’t as high since your life’s work is saved on those hard drives, unaffected by the cyber attack as they’re not connected to the Internet.

This fictional story isn’t far from the truth. In 2019, six photographers in the Indian city of Coimbatore inadvertently downloaded a ransomware file from the cloud service they were using to manage their photos. They had to pay a $980 ransom to retrieve the files but were offered a discount if they paid quickly. Reporters that traffic large amounts of data, such as multimedia journalists with terabytes of photos, videos, and audio, or watchdogs that can have thousands of public documents saved on a hard drive, understand how an entire life’s work can exist on a hard drive.

That’s why it’s important to frequently backup files on disks that don’t stay connected to your computers. Unplug your external backup device once a successful backup is completed. The tools in this toolbox help you create automatic backups based on what type of system you are using.

5.1 Backup Operating Systems

Choose any one of the tools listed to help you create automatic backups based on what type of system you are using.

Narrow your search by selecting your OS
Type
1
Level
0h 30min
Time

Time Machine Backup

Use this tool to set up automatic backups of Mac operating systems.

Type
1
Level
0h 30min
Time

Windows 10 - Auto-Backup

Use this tool to set up automatic backups of Windows 10 operating systems.

Additional Training & Resources

Explore training courses, videos, sharable content and other resources about this toolbox topic. Browse additional training resources below.

Understanding Cyber Risk for Journalists

GCA created the GCA Learning Portal to offer additional training and resources supplemental to the Cybersecurity Toolkit....

Read More